AFYP In the Know: A Technical Journey, Part I

Beauty and the Beast, Jr., was a huge hit! Acting for Young People is delighted to be able to support our students' outstanding performances with fun, creative technical elements. Learn a little more about how our scenery, lighting, and costumes were created! Today, we'll look at the scenic design.

Kaity's design on paper

Kaity's design on paper

A set is used to suggest time and place on stage. Sets can be complex with moving pieces (many Broadway shows even have mechanical pieces!) or can be as simple as a chair on a blank stage. It is the job of the set designer to decide what type of set will be most effective for telling the story of the play.

Kaity Cookson is our scenic designer. Kaity's inspiration for the Beauty and the Beast, Jr. set was the familiar color schemes and designs from the animated film. This led to her decision to design for periaktois. A periaktoi is an ancient Greek theatre set piece. Each periaktoi has three facings and can be rotated to show three different locations. Kaity designed looks for the castle, the village, and the woods.

Angelina Pineda and Lorena Berger were our scenic artists and Colby Snyder was our carpenter. A carpenter builds the set and a scenic artist paints it. Colby built the mechanism that allowed our periaktois to rotate and Angelina and Lorena painted all six facings. 

Which part of scenic design sounds the most interesting to you? Would you be a designer, a carpenter, or a scenic artist? Tell us in the comments below!

Small details like the Bookseller's Cart help bring a set to life in multidimensional ways

Small details like the Bookseller's Cart help bring a set to life in multidimensional ways